Online Dog Behavior Help

 

Michael Baugh CDBC CPDT-KSA

I’ve actually be doing remote dog training consultations with clients for long time, mostly for dogs who are too fearful or aggressive to tolerate anyone being in their home – and sometimes for people who are outside our in-person service area. Teaching and training at a distance is nothing new for me. You could say I’ve been preparing for this age of social distancing for years.

Setting goals together. The first thing I do in any consultation is listen. More than anything I want to know what is important to you. What matters most for you and your life with your dog. Tell me what’s going on. Before our consultation you’ll have completed a questionnaire to give me some background. During the conversation online (or in person) we can fill in some gaps. I want to know what’s troubling you and your dog.

That leads us to setting concrete goals for our work together. Once we have goals jotted down we can lay out a training plan for our dog. How are we going to fix the stuff we don’t like? How are we going to teach you dog to be the best version of himself?

Dog Behavior change is rooted in training. If we want our dogs to stop doing bad stuff (dangerous stuff), we have to teach him what we want him to do instead. That’s how we change our dog’s behavior. We know what we want him to stop doing. Let’s set some new boundaries and safety measures for our life with out dog, of course.  But now what do we want him to actually do? We can make a list of things you’ve already taught him. And, let’s map out the skills he still needs to learn. That’s the heart and soul of our behavior change plan.

The mechanics and timing of dog training. The foundation of dog training is actually human learning. Whether we are in the same room or connected by a live video link, trainers are teaching their clients how to communicate with dogs. Dog training is about learning mechanical skills and good timing – what behavior are we asking the dog to do? How are we letting him know when he gets it right so he does it again? How do we time all that so it is a clear and understandable message for the dog?  We trainers teach a series of simple but crucial human skills:

  • How to position our bodies
  • Where to place or rest our hands
  • When to click
  • When to reach for the treat bag (and when not to)
  • How to deliver the food reinforcement
  • And how to cue. Yes, we teach the cue last in many cases.

The best way to teach these human skills is by demonstrating. Then we observe while our human client tries these new moves out for themselves. We can do this with clients in person, yes. And, it’s just as effective when taught using a visual link in real time with a laptop or tablet.

Watch this. Many of us are visual learners. A dog behaviorist or trainer on remote consultation will often demonstrate a skill live on the video link using his or her own dog. That can be fun. But one of the coolest parts of doing a video remote is the ability to share our screen so we can show you detailed pre-recorded video instructions in real time. Often the best way to make a lesson clear and relatable is to show how it is taught – but also how it will look when it’s done. That, in my opinion, is one of the real advantages of remote video learning. You have all the resources on my laptop right there at your fingertips.

Follow up.  Once we are done working together you’ll want to have resources you can reference days, even weeks later. No problem. We’ll record our consultation for  you and then share it for you to review at your convenience. And, we’ll send out the notes we took during our session in a comprehensive report:

  • Your goals
  • The plan agreed on together
  • And all the exercises we covered
  • Plus links to relevant videos and other resources

We’ll also stay connected every day using our exclusive online training journal.

Remote dog training and behavior consultations are full-service. They are, I daresay, as good if not better in some cases than in-person work. They are:

  • Convenient to schedule (we often do remote consults at times we would to be able to see clients in person).
  • Not limited by geography. It doesn’t matter where you live in the world.
  • Safe and distraction free.
  • Less expensive.

All that said, please don’t misunderstand me. I do like meeting people and their dogs in person. Of course I do. But more than anything, I like helping people and their dogs. I’m genuinely happy there is technology and know-how available so that you can get tha help no matter how far we are from each other.

 

 

Michael Baugh and Victoria Thibodeaux teach dog training in Houston, TX. But, through remote consultations they are able to help people and their dogs around the world.

 

Coronavirus: Our Response – Be Safe and Stay Flexible

Michael Baugh, Houston dog trainerMichael Baugh CDBC CPDT-KSA

Anyone who’s worked with me knows I preach this all the time: It only takes a small shift in the environment to  change behavior (sometimes in a big way).  And there aren’t many things smaller than an itty bitty microscopic virus.

Michael’s Dogs Houston dog trainers Victoria Thibodeaux and I are staying flexible and shifting our behavior in response to the change in our environment (I’ll say the name – The Coronavirus that causes Covid-19). Here’s where things stand right now.

We are still doing in-home dog behavior consultations and training lessons. There is no change in our schedule. However, you will notice some slight changes in our behavior.

  • We will ask if we can wash our hands at the beginning of our appointment and maybe again at the end.
  • We will ask that you have your own treat bag (the kind that can clip on to your shorts or trousers). We will not be passing our treat bag back and forth.
  • We will provide you with your own clicker and ask that you keep it. We will also not pass clickers back and forth.

We are waiving the cancellation penalty for illness. You can now cancel or ask to reschedule within 48 hours of your appointment if:

  • You have fever or other flulike symptoms (even the day of the appointment). Call and cancel or reschedule. Note: we will reschedule a minimum of 4-weeks later (time for you to recover and self-quarantine).
  • Anyone in your household has the virus.
  • You have been exposed to someone outside your household who has the virus.

We are on the honor system here. Do not cancel or ask to reschedule if:

  • You forgot your child had a game the same evening of our appointment (they are all probably cancelled anyway).
  • Your hairdresser had an opening and you want to go to that instead.
  • You had too much wine last night and you are hung over today.
  • Any other non-health related reason. Please, just be cool about this.

We will not risk your health in the interest of our financial bottom line. That would be selfish and stupid. We will cancel or ask to reschedule if:

  • We have fever or flulike symptoms. Note: I have seasonal allergies. To make sure I am not otherwise sick I’m taking my temperature twice daily
  • We have been exposed to anyone with the virus in or outside of our own household.

Remote Consultations – We will maintain our commitment to you and your dogs even if you or one of us is quarantined. I’m happy to say Victoria and I have been ahead of the curve when it comes to offering effective remote dog behavior consultations. We will be suggesting these for cases that are most appropriate. We will also honor your request to work remotely with us. Here’s a link to our Video Remote and Phone Consultations Page so you can learn a bit more about it. I’d also be happy to chat with you to share more information about how they work.

Quick Recap: Here are the main points to rememberer.

  • We’d still love to see you in person.
  • Let’s be thoughtful about our in-person meetings (scrub-a-dub-dub).
  • Rescheduling is fine – we may have to reschedule, too (but I hope not).
  • Remote consults are a good option.

Here’s the other thing you know I teach and preach all the time. Behavior changes. That is the nature of things. We can expect the behavior of this virus to change. It will not be as intrusive a factor in our lives forever. We will get through this – and Victoria and I will be here for you and your dogs through it and long after.

Stay safe and stay healthy.

Introducing Victoria Thibodeaux

Michael Baugh CDBC CPDT-KSA

I knew Victoria Thibodeaux was a talented dog trainer even before I officially met her. She and her dog, Zelda, had set up camp near the back wall of our Karen Pryor Academy Class at The Fundamental Dog in Montgomery, TX. I had my eye on the open space in the back corner for myself and Stella. They looked like good enough neighbors.

You can learn a lot about a trainer by watching how they interact with their own dog. They word I thought of then (and again now) is “intuitive.” Victoria and Zelda worked their way through the class with an intuitive sense of connectedness – not too flashy – just simple and graceful in equal measure. It was amazing to see weekend after weekend when we met for class. “Who is teaching whom?” I thought. The synergy – unpretentious and elegant. And, on top of it all, they were great neighbors. We became friends. “That one,” I remember thinking to myself, “We’re going to work together someday.”

And now, five years later, that someday is here. Victoria started full time March 1st with Michael’s Dogs, now Michael’s Dogs Behavior Group. I asked Victoria to do this blog with me interview style, like a Rolling Stone piece minus the celebrity nonsense.

MB: I’m always curious about how trainers raise their own dogs. Zelda is amazing. Your puppy, Freddie, is 5 months old now. He seems delightful, too. But it can’t all be perfect puppy all the time. Right?

VT:  You are right about that. Like any puppy, if I don’t give him something to do, he will take it upon himself to find something to do. Right now, the “naughty” behaviors we are working on are jumping up on counters and parading my shoes and socks around.

So, I stay ahead of the game. I give him plenty of things to do when he is not confined so he doesn’t look for things to do on the countertops. I hide my shoes and socks. But, when I forget to hide them, I ask him to trade them for a treat, which he happily does.

I am training Freddie to be a multi-purpose working dog. We have plans to compete in the show ring, sport dog world, and even some service dog tasks.

MB: Good trainers like you have a lot of education. What part of that education (or even your one life experience training dogs) do you depend on most when working with your clients. What little golden nuggets of advice seem to come up again and again?

VT: Two things come to mind. First, always be kind. I’ve known many well-intentioned trainers who shame clients for using tools or training methods they do not agree with.  People do the best they can with whatever tools and information they have. Our job is not to make them feel bad about any of that, but to provide the best path forward with kindness and compassion. The second is to help people to understand the same is true for their dogs. Our dogs are always doing the best they can with whatever tools and information they have. If we want them to behave differently, we must give them different tools and information. Always with kindness and compassion.

MB: You just finished Dr. Susan Friedman’s Living and Learning with Animals Course. It’s all about Applied Behavior Analysis. That’s heavy stuff. What was your big take-away from that course?

VT: Yes, it was such a fun and informative course! Applied Behavior Analysis is all about breaking behaviors down to their core and understanding what causes the behavior to happen in the first place, as well as what makes the behavior more likely to continue or discontinue. I feel like I have a clearer way of looking at and evaluating all behavior, but especially aggressive dog behavior.

MB: People often joke that we are training them more than their dog. What do you think? Who is learning more in your training sessions, the human or the dog? 

VT:  Most of the time I would agree, the people are usually the ones learning more. They have to develop new communication skills with their dogs, carve out time in their already busy days to practice these new skills, and sometimes make lifestyle changes, all of which can feel daunting.

Though the dogs are learning a lot as well.

MB: This work can be emotionally draining sometimes. What’s a bad day at work look like for you, and what’s your advice to other trainers for getting through the tough days?

VT: You are right. Not all days are good days. Sometimes the training plans don’t play out as intended. Sometimes the dog or human clients are having a bad day and everyone needs a break. I have been peed, vomited, and pooped on all in the same day. This job is not all rainbows.

During those tough days, I regularly stop to breathe. Occasionally I even ask my clients to do this with me. Taking a few seconds to stop and practice deep breathing really helps us come back to the task at hand with a calmer brain.

MB: We talk to our clients a lot about positive reinforcement. When you think about what’s most reinforcing for your as a trainer, what comes to mind? What really gets you up and going in the morning?

VT: More than anything, I enjoy being an advocate for the dogs and behavior science. Of course, seeing my clients make progress towards their goals is very reinforcing for me. Deeper than that, I strive to help modernize our cultural understanding of dogs. I really am a “behavior geek,” and a “dog nerd,” if you will. Though I find behavior science absolutely fascinating, my mission is always to find ways to make it easy for the average person to understand and apply those principles. This is how I believe we will see a cultural shift take place. And I am strongly motivated to be a part of that cultural shift.

Michael Baugh and Victoria Thibodeaux teach dog training in Houston, TX